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Anecdotes & Quotes

Life is too short for a long story

Life is too short for a long story

Life is too short for a long story.
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

One good anecdote is worth a volume of biography.
William Ellery Channing

Anecdotes and maxims are rich treasures to the man of the world, for he knows how to introduce the former at fit place in conversation.
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

Like many rich men, he thought in anecdotes; like many simple women, she thought in terms of biography.
Anita Brookner

A collections of anecdotes and maxims is the greatest of treasures for the man of the world, for he knows how to intersperse conversation with the former in fit places, and to recollect the latter on proper occasions.
Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

When a man fell into his anecdotage it was a sign for him to retire from the world.
Benjamin Disraeli

Believe The Impossible

Every great achievement was once impossible until someone set a goal to make it a reality.
Lewis Carroll’s famous masterpiece Through the Looking Glass contains a story that exemplifies the need to dream the impossible dream. There is a conversation between Alice and the queen, which goes like this: “I can’t believe that!” said Alice. “Can’t you?” the queen said in a pitying tone. “Try again, draw a long breath, and shut your eyes.”
Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said. “One can’t believe impossible things.”
“I dare say you haven’t had much practice,” said the queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half an hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”
When you dare to dream, many marvels can be accomplished. The trouble is, most people never start dreaming their impossible dream.

The Whole World Came Together

The young mother was ready for a few minutes of relaxation after a long and demanding day. However, her young daughter had other plans for her mother’s time.
“Read me a story, Mom,” the little girl requested. “Give Mommy a few minutes to relax and unwind. Then I’ll be happy to read you a story,” pleaded the mother.
The little girl was insistent that Mommy read to her now. With a stroke of genius, the mother tore off the back page of the magazine she was reading. It contained a full-page picture of the world. As she tore it into several pieces, Mom asked her daughter to put the picture together and then she would read her a story. Surely this would buy her considerable relaxing moments.
A short time later, the little girl announced the completion of her puzzle project. To her astonishment, she found the world picture completely assembled. When she asked her daughter how she managed to do it so quickly, the little girl explained that on the reverse side of the page was the picture of a little girl. “You see, Mommy, when I got the little girl together, the whole world came together.”
Each of us has the responsibility to put our world together. It starts by getting ourselves put together. We can become better parents, friends, spouses, employees, and employers. The first step is changing our attitude.

Beautiful credit! The foundation of modern society. Who shall say that this is not the golden age of mutual trust, of unlimited reliance upon human promises? That is a peculiar condition of society which enables a whole nation to instantly recognize point and meaning in the familiar newspaper anecdote, which puts into the mouth of a distinguished speculator in lands and mines this remark: — ”I wasn’t worth a cent two years ago, and now I owe two millions of dollars.”
Mark Twain

Twenty or thirty years ago, in the army, we had a lot of obscure adventures, and years later we tell them at parties, and suddenly we realize that those two very difficult years of our lives have become lumped together into a few episodes that have lodged in our memory in a standardized form, and are always told in a standardized way, in the same words. But in fact that lump of memories has nothing whatsoever to do with our experience of those two years in the army and what it has made of us.
Vaclav Havel

Picasso was one day in a market, and a woman saw him and said “Mr. Picasso, it’s great to see you, I’m a huge fan. He says “Nice to meet you”. She says “My Picasso she pulled out a piece of paper and a pencil” She said “Mr. Picasso, can you do a little piece of art for me? Can you do a little drawing?”.
He said “Absolutely!” He did a beautiful drawing. And she looked at it and said “Oh! Mr. Picasso, Fantastic!”. She starts walking away, he goes “Ah my dear lady, that’ll be a million dollars”. She says “Mr. Picasso, a million dollars, it took you 30 seconds to do that.” He said, “My dear lady, it took me 30 years [pause] to do that in 30 seconds”.
Robin Sharma

Many people feel empty, a world that seemed so strong just collapsed. Forty years have been wasted on stupid strife for the sake of an unsuccessful experiment. The values gathered together have vanished, the strategies for survival have become ridiculous. And so forty years of our lives have become a story, a bad anecdote. But it may be possible to remember these adventures with a kind of irony.
George Konrad

Overheard this on a London bus: First Woman: “I don’t know what to get Fred for his birthday.”
Second Woman: “Why don’t you get him a book?”
First Woman: (after a moment’s thought) “Nah, he’s already got a book.”

At the fish hatchery where I work, we have a small display that describes the now-extinct Michigan Grayling (a kind of fish). This summer, I had the following conversation with a tourist:

Tourist: “Is the Grayling still extinct?”
Me: “Yes sir, it doesn’t exist anymore.”
Tourist: “Any thoughts of bringing it back?”
Me: “No, I don’t think that’s possible.”
Tourist: “Why not?”
Me: “Because it’s extinct.”
Tourist: “Still?”
Me: “Yes.”
Frustrated, he left.

I was checking out at the local Foodland with just a few items, and the lady behind me put her things on the belt close to mine. I picked up one of those dividers that they keep by the cash register and placed it between our things so they wouldn’t get mixed. After the girl had scanned all of my items, she picked up the divider and looked all over it for the bar code so she could scan it. Not finding the bar code she said to me, “Do you know how much this is?”

I said, “I’ve changed my mind; I don’t think I’ll buy that today.”

She said, “OK,” and I paid her for the things and left. She had no clue about what had just happened.


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